LIFESTYLE

Will Cuba be the Next Hot Housing Market?
Dilapidated homes in the country are going up for sale for the first time in 50 years.
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A disabled man sits at his home's entrance in Havana, Cuba, Thursday, Nov. 3, 2011. Cuba announced Thursday it will allow real estate to be bought and sold for the first time since the early days of the revolution, the most important reform yet in a series of free-market changes under President Raul Castro.(AP Photo/Franklin Reyes)
(AP2011)

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A man drives a horse and carriage in Old Havana, Cuba, Thursday, Nov. 3, 2011. Cuba announced Thursday it will allow real estate to be bought and sold for the first time since the early days of the revolution, the most important reform yet in a series of free-market changes under President Raul Castro.(AP Photo/Franklin Reyes)
(AP2011)

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A man looks out from a building in Havana, Cuba, Thursday, Nov. 3, 2011. Cuba announced Thursday it will allow real estate to be bought and sold for the first time since the early days of the revolution, the most important reform yet in a series of free-market changes under President Raul Castro.(AP Photo/Franklin Reyes)
(AP2011)

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A woman walks downstairs as she leaves her home in Old Havana, Cuba, Thursday, Nov. 3, 2011. Cuba announced Thursday it will allow real estate to be bought and sold for the first time since the early days of the revolution, the most important reform yet in a series of free-market changes under President Raul Castro. (AP Photo/Franklin Reyes)
(AP2011)

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Nilda Bouzo, right, speaks with her husband Ives Lopez next to a sign that reads in Spanish " Exchange Apartment Two for One" in their home balcony in Havana, Cuba, Thursday, Nov. 3, 2011. Property exchanges and signs such as the one in the picture were already legal in Cuba. In addition, the government announced Thursday they will also allow real estate to be bought and sold for the first time since the early days of the revolution in what is believed to be one of the most important reform yet in a series of free-market changes under President Raul Castro. (AP Photo/Franklin Reyes)
(AP2011)

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A woman looks out from her balcony in an old building in Havana, Cuba, Friday, Nov. 4, 2011. With the announcement that Cubans will now be able to buy and sell homes, President Raul Castro has delivered on his second major promise this year to relax the government's iron grip over all aspects of the economy. The new housing law and a similar one on automobile sales comes after the island's opening to a growing class of small-business owners. (AP/Photo/Franklin Reyes)

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Electricity meters cover a wall on the bottom floor of an apartment building in Havana, Cuba, Friday Nov. 4, 2011. With the announcement that Cubans will now be able to buy and sell homes, President Raul Castro has delivered on his second major promise this year to relax the government's iron grip over all aspects of the economy. The new housing law and a similar one on automobile sales comes after the island's opening to a growing class of small-business owners. (AP/Photo/Franklin Reyes)

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A man leaves a building in Havana, Cuba, Friday, Nov. 4, 2011. With the announcement that Cubans will now be able to buy and sell homes, President Raul Castro has delivered on his second major promise this year to relax the government's iron grip over all aspects of the economy. The new housing law and a similar one on automobile sales comes after the island's opening to a growing class of small-business owners. (AP/Photo/Franklin Reyes)

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A woman puts her clothes to dry in Havana, Cuba, Friday, Nov. 4, 2011. With the announcement that Cubans will now be able to buy and sell homes, President Raul Castro has delivered on his second major promise this year to relax the government's iron grip over all aspects of the economy. The new housing law and a similar one on automobile sales comes after the island's opening to a growing class of small-business owners. (AP/Photo/Franklin Reyes)

Will Cuba be the Next Hot Housing Market?

Dilapidated homes in the country are going up for sale for the first time in 50 years.

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