Fitness + Well-being

Why keeping secrets is bad for your health

Psst — wanna know a secret health tip? Don’t keep secrets. They’re bad for you, scientists found.

A new study at Columbia University found that bottling up secrets can lead to a lower sense of well-being.

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Researchers combed through 10 studies and analyzed 13,000 secrets, spanning topics such as romantic desire, finances and sexual behavior.

 

 

“Secrets exert a gravitational pull on our attention,” Malia Mason, co-author of the study and associate professor of management at Columbia Business School, wrote in a press release. “It’s the cyclical revisiting of our mistakes that explains the harmful effects that secrets can have on our well-being.”

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Scientists also found that keeping things hush-hush could make a dent on your productivity.

“Keeping secrets can also shift a person’s focus from the task at hand to their secrets, which clearly can have a detrimental effect on task performanc,” Manson said.

First published on the New York Post