LIFESTYLE

A Bicultural Holiday: Mixing Traditions

BETHLEHEM, WEST BANK - DECEMBER 24:  Iman Haddid and her 2-year-old daughter Dallah light votive candles at the Church of the Nativity December 24, 2004 in the biblical town of Bethlehem in the West Bank. A smaller crowd than in prevous years gathered in Manger Square for the start of the Christmas festivities at the traditional birthplace of Jesus with the local Palestinian governor blaming Israel for not easing security restrictions in time.  (Photo by David Silverman/Getty Images)

BETHLEHEM, WEST BANK - DECEMBER 24: Iman Haddid and her 2-year-old daughter Dallah light votive candles at the Church of the Nativity December 24, 2004 in the biblical town of Bethlehem in the West Bank. A smaller crowd than in prevous years gathered in Manger Square for the start of the Christmas festivities at the traditional birthplace of Jesus with the local Palestinian governor blaming Israel for not easing security restrictions in time. (Photo by David Silverman/Getty Images)  (2004 Getty Images)

Fifteen years ago I married Carlos, a Salvadoran immigrant who spoke little English. Because we were young, pregnant, and poor at the time—instead of moving to our own place—I moved Carlos into my parents’ house where I was still living. From the outside it didn’t seem like the most ideal situation, but living with my English-speaking Anglo parents turned out to be a unique opportunity for Carlos to get a crash course in English and American culture.

Over the years, out of my own passion for Latino culture, a need for our boys to know their roots, and a desire to make Carlos happy, I have slowly incorporated Salvadoran traditions into our holiday. The Christmas season at Casa López is most certainly bicultural, and each year I learn something new or Carlos remembers something he misses, and we add it into the mix.

Read more at Mamiverse.

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