LIFESTYLE

'Being Latino' This Week On Facebook

There are many great institutions of higher learning that graduate some of the most successful people in the world. No one can deny that Latino progress relies heavily on increasing the number of Latinos who receive an education—a good education— beyond high school. But formal education is only one part of the equation; as Albert Einstein said, ““Education is what remains after one has forgotten everything he learned in school.”

Too often, even the most intelligent individual stops there; never questioning what he or she has been taught. Not realizing that our history books are often either lacking information or are fraught with misinformation, they accept history books and what they’re taught in classrooms to be the be-all, end-all word on our very complicated pasts. It is the truly educated—those who not only learned facts, but gained the ability to think critically—who dare to question what we think we know.

The review of "If Jesus were Gay and other Poems" (Emanuel Xavier) ignited a firestorm of controversy simply because the subject matter (the book) dares to ask a question. While many extolled the virtues of the author’s courage, “These kinds of books—the kind that challenge the mainstream narratives, that provoke thought and discussion—are not only interesting, but vital. 

Thanks so much for posting this; I can't wait to check it out!” Those with more stringent religious beliefs would rather not question the foundation of those beliefs: “Homosexual behavior is a grave sin, it goes against the way God created it to be; man and woman, husband and wife. Jesus had no flaws, he had a human nature but was also Divine. Jesus is God the Son, the second person of the Blessed Trinity.”

Rocking our foundation is necessary for intellectual progress. Questioning ‘established’ beliefs drives us to seek answers. The author of The horrible truth about the Aztecs did just that and learned much about the Aztecs that isn’t taught and wasn’t shown in movies like Apocalypto; finding there is much more below the surface of superficial knowledge.

That’s true about more than just historical facts; it is true in all of life. A real education consists of critical thinking skills; continuing discussions of problems that affects us until a solution has been found, and listening to or reading about the real and very personal stories behind facts and statistics; stories that are often much more complicated than what we see. With this can we become the society of educated Latinos we should and hope to be.

Being Latino is a communication platform whose mission is to educate and connect all peoples across the global Latino spectrum. Being Latino is the largest fan page for Latinos on Facebook.

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Being Latino is a communication platform whose mission is to educate and connect all peoples across the global Latino spectrum. Being Latino is the largest fan page for Latinos on Facebook.

Follow us on twitter.com/foxnewslatino
Like us at facebook.com/foxnewslatino