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Buying

How to Write an Offer Letter That Will Win the House

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offer letter sealed with wax, feather quill (t_kimura)

You love the house sooo much. The problem is, lots of other people probably do, too. How can you stand out in a competitive environment? Try writing an offer letter that knocks the seller's socks off.

"Making the highest offer is typically the best way to win a bid, but when a seller is faced with two very similar offers, a letter can oftentimes tip the scales toward yours," says Realtor Mindy Jensen of Longmont, CO.

So how do you use writing to woo a seller to your side? Check out these snippets from winning offer letters, then learn how you can follow in the footsteps of these real-life buyers.

A winning game plan

The words that wooed: After seeing a number of properties that have not "spoken" to us in a significant way, we were delighted to discover your home, with its mixture of charm and warmth. We envision family gatherings within its open living area and drinking coffee while watching our children play in the pool. As basketball is in the family blood (Steve is a former employee of the National Basketball Association), I'm sure there will be plenty of pick-up games for everyone.

Why it worked: "My clients were up against a better offer from a builder, but the seller couldn't bear the idea of their house being torn down," explains Anne West, a Realtor with Coldwell Banker Residential Brokerage in Winnetka, IL. "They wanted to sell their home to someone who would raise their family there and who would love it as much as they had, and my clients were able to articulate that they were just that family."

How to do it yourself: Find out some backstory about the owners or other bidders if you can. The tidbit about the builder, for example, was crucial knowledge. But for any property, most sellers who have taken good care of their homes want to make sure they will be loved by the next owner, too, so let your enthusiasm shine to gain the edge over pricier offers.

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Must love dogs

The words that wooed: My husband and I have been searching for our first home, and we believe your house will be the perfect place to raise our growing family. Our son is due in September, and I know he will be so happy playing in the fabulous backyard with our two dogs.

Why it worked: "The seller appreciated her praising specific things that were obviously installed by the homeowners," says Mindy Jensen, a Realtor in Longmont, CO. "But the tipping point was when she included a picture of her dog with the letter. The seller specifically allowed her to match the highest offer, based solely on her dog."

How to do it yourself: Make yourself relatable. Take a cue from the lovingly tended roses or, in this case, a dog, and try to glean what the seller values. It could be kids, a dog, or even a love of gardening. If you share those same interests, offer them up. You never know what phrases may spur the seller to choose your offer over another.

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This way to Easy Street

The words that wooed: We are not looking for a bargain, just a fair price for something nice. This would be a cash sale, and we could close quickly or at a convenient time for you.

Why it worked: "This was a no-brainer for the seller, because you can tell these folks are clued in, and money talks," says Bruce Ailion, a real estate agent with Re/Max Atlanta. "This letter makes it clear that this is going to be an easy transaction: cash sale, market price, close quickly or on your timetable."

How to do it yourself: Get your ducks in a row before you make an offer. Even if you're not doing an all-cash offer, have a pre-approval in hand. Especially in a seller's market, make it clear that you are going to be easy to work with and that the seller can call the shots.

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Sentiment sells

The words that wooed: We grew up in the city and our parents live very close by; one of them is living very close to your home. It's important to find a home close to our family, so that when we start our family, our children will be close to their grandparents."

Why it worked: "If the seller has raised their own family there, they have an emotional connection to the house," says David Feldberg, broker/owner of Coastal Real Estate Group in Newport Beach, CA. "Talking about several generations plucks those heart strings."

How to do it yourself: Include details about your family and connection to the area. And always include a photo. When the seller is considering multiple offers, the photo makes your offer stand out from the pack.

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Flattery can get you everywhere

The words that wooed: From the moment I walked in, I knew this place felt like home. (Well if I am being honest, I fell in love with the wallpaper in the bathroom first!! ha-ha.) I also really appreciate the attention to detail in the upgrades you made: the stain on the floors, the wall colors and the charming lights, and I absolutely love your furniture selection.

Why it worked: "My client clearly admired the seller's decor decisions," says John Michael Grafft with Berkshire Hathaway Koenig Rubloff in Chicago. "It turned out she was an interior designer. Everyone appreciates a sincere compliment."

How to do it yourself: Find details that you love about the home and mention them so it's clear you're not sending a generic letter to every potential property seller. The seller chose those design elements, so find something you love that you can mention sincerely. Even if you are planning to change everything about a place you consider a fixer-upper, compliment the fact that the seller took great care of the home.

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Short and sweet

The words that wooed: Semper fi.

Why it worked: "The rest of the letter was great, but in all honesty, that phrase at the end of his letter sealed the deal. He and the seller were both Marines," says Mindy Jensen, a Realtor in Longmont, CO.

How to do it yourself: Common interests can make all the difference, but don't lie. That goes for military service, of course, but also other details. Don't tell the seller that you want to raise your children there, if you don't have any. Instead, if you hope to eventually have a family, you can say, "I hope to someday be able to raise my children in this beautiful home."

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Watch: The Features That Help a Home Sell Fastest