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Celeb Homes

Kind of True: Former NYC Pad of Miles Davis Finds Buyer

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    Miles Davis (2011 Gamma-Rapho)

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    Apartment interior

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    Building exterior

If you've dreamed of owning the tiny apartment on the Upper West Side that jazz legend Miles Davis once called home, you're too late. The approximately 500-square-foot co-op, which hit the market in early May, already has a contract over asking price, listing agent Kristina Ojdanic told us.

The apartment is on the second floor of the historic townhouse at 312 W. 77th St. in New York City, where Davis lived for about 25 years.

I have a secondhand connection to Davis. My cousin, artist Jo Gelbard, painted with Davis in the 1980s, creating large, color-filled abstracts together for about 10 years when they both lived on Fifth Avenue.

Gelbard says Davis lived on West 77th Street, now called Miles Davis Way, "during the unfortunate period when he was involved with heavy drugs and plagued by health issues due to his abusive lifestyle."

Curbed New York says the trumpeter was a neighborhood fixture, sitting on the brownstone stoop, talking to neighbors, and entertaining other jazz legends, including Herbie Hancock, Dizzy Gillespie, and Art Blakey. The property was featured in "Miles Ahead," the recent biopic of Davis.

The townhouse was eventually divided into six co-op apartments. This unit, 2F, was listed on May 5 for $495,000 (a bargain for the area). It's located just a hop, skip, and a jump from Riverside Park and Zabar's.

The apartment features tree-lined street views, hardwood floors, exposed brick, and a spacious kitchen with what looks like builder-grade white, laminate cabinets.

Ojdanic says the apartment received several offers in the few weeks it's been on the market. The winning bidder is a woman who "loves" the building's jazz history, she says.