HEALTH

Kids with Zika in Brazil aging with severe microcephaly issues
While the Brazilian government has provided therapy and some financial assistance, mothers of kids afflicted by Zika say it doesn't come close to meeting the overwhelming needs of caring for children with severe development delays.
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In this Sept. 27, 2016 photo, Angelica Pereira's 1-year-old daughter Luiza, disabled by the Zika virus, looks up during a physical therapy session at the UPAE hospital in Caruaru, Pernambuco state, Brazil. Earlier this year, a surge in cases of babies born with small heads in northeast Brazil set off alarm worldwide about Zika, which numerous studies have linked to the birth defect known as microcephaly. (AP Photo/Felipe Dana)
(Copyright 2016 The Associated Press. All rights reserved.)

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FILE - In this Dec. 22, 2015 file photo, Angelica Pereira, right, holds her daughter Luiza, disabled by the Zika syndrome, as she waits for their appointment with a neurologist at the Mestre Vitalino Hospital in Caruaru, Pernambuco state, Brazil. Treating children with neurological problems is not cheap. Researchers exploring the health burden for governments fighting Zika conclude that each child with microcephaly in Brazil would cost about $95,000 in lifetime medical expenses. (AP Photo/Felipe Dana, File)
(Copyright 2016 The Associated Press. All rights reserved.)

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In this Sept. 27, 2016 photo, Angelica Pereira, left, watches as her 1-year-old daughter Luiza, disabled by the Zika virus, goes through a physical therapy session at the UPAE hospital in Caruaru, Pernambuco state, Brazil. Many mothers whose babies have been disabled by the Zika virus end up borrowing money from relatives to pay for private hospitals and doctors for specialized treatment. For many that is not an option; just trying to buy baby formula is a struggle. (AP Photo/Felipe Dana)
(Copyright 2016 The Associated Press. All rights reserved.)

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In this Oct. 1, 2016 photo, mothers and friends hold their babies, born with microcephaly, one of many serious medical problems that be caused by congenital Zika syndrome, from left, Alice Vitoria, Juan Pedro, and Joao Guilherme, during a birthday party, in Recife, Pernambuco state, Brazil. Away from medical facilities, many of the mothers of babies born with microcephaly get together and try to keep a semblance of normalcy by celebrating milestones, like first birthdays. (AP Photo/Felipe Dana)
(Copyright 2016 The Associated Press. All rights reserved.)

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In this Sept. 29, 2016 photo, Aedes aegypti mosquitoes, responsible for transmitting Zika, sit in a petri dish at the Fiocruz Institute in Recife, Brazil. Brazil has confirmed more than 2,000 cases of microcephaly so far, and Health Minister Ricardo Barros says almost all of these babies are enrolled in rehabilitation centers to stimulate development. More than half of the children are from poor households with a monthly income of less than $70. (AP Photo/Felipe Dana)
(Copyright 2016 The Associated Press. All rights reserved.)

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In this Sept. 26, 2016 photo, Angelica Pereira holds her daughter Luiza, who was born with microcephaly, as her husband Dejailson Arruda stands by at their home in Santa Cruz do Capibaribe, Pernambuco state, Brazil. Pereira says itâs a victory just for her daughter Luiza to reach her first birthday. Despite Luizaâs suffering from daily seizures and breathing problems, Pereira is hopeful her health and motor skills will improve with time. (AP Photo/Felipe Dana)
(Copyright 2016 The Associated Press. All rights reserved.)

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FILE - In this Dec. 23, 2015 file photo, Angelica Pereira, left, holds her daughter Luiza, who was born with microcephaly because of the Zika virus, as she sits with her husband Dejailson Arruda, at their home in Santa Cruz do Capibaribe, Pernambuco state, Brazil. While the government has provided therapy and some financial assistance, mothers such as Pereira say it doesn't come close to meeting their overwhelming needs caring for children with severe development delays. (AP Photo/Felipe Dana, File)
(Copyright 2016 The Associated Press. All rights reserved.)

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In this Sept. 27, 2016 photo, Angelica Pereira holds her daughter Luiza, as she waits outside her home for a driver sent to fetch her and other mothers with babies disabled by the Zika virus, to drive them to a physical therapy session, in Santa Cruz do Capibaribe, Pernambuco state, Brazil. "We are always chasing something. We have to drop everything else, all our chores, our homes," said the 21-year-old. "There are so many of us with children with special needs. (The government) is forgetting about that." (AP Photo/Felipe Dana)
(Copyright 2016 The Associated Press. All rights reserved.)

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FILE - In this Jan. 26, 2016, file photo, municipal workers refill an insecticide sprayer during an operation to combat the Aedes aegypti mosquitoes that transmits the Zika virus in the Imbiribeira neighborhood of Recife, Pernambuco state, Brazil. The Zika crisis comes as Latin America's largest nation weathers a two-year recession that has pushed inflation and unemployment to over 10 percent.(AP Photo/Felipe Dana, File)
(Copyright 2016 The Associated Press. All rights reserved.)

Kids with Zika in Brazil aging with severe microcephaly issues

While the Brazilian government has provided therapy and some financial assistance, mothers of kids afflicted by Zika say it doesn't come close to meeting the overwhelming needs of caring for children with severe development delays.

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