HEALTH

Preemies Comforted By Soothing Rhythms Of Spanish Lullabies
Research shows preemies too small and fragile to be comforted by human touch benefit from the vibrations and soothing rhythms of music.
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Music therapist Elizabeth Klinger, right, quietly plays guitar and sings for Augustin as he grips the hand of his mother, Lucy Morales, in the newborn intensive care unit at Ann & Robert H. Lurie Children's Hospital in Chicago on Monday, May 6, 2013. "The music relaxes him, it makes him feel more calm" and helps him sleep better too, Lucy Morales said. "Sometimes it makes us cry." (AP Photo/M. Spencer Green)

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Music therapist Elizabeth Klinger, right, quietly plays guitar and sings for Augustin as his mother, Lucy Morales, sits next to him in the newborn intensive care unit at Ann & Robert H. Lurie Children's Hospital in Chicago on Monday, May 6, 2013. "What music therapy can uniquely provide is that passive listening experience that just encourages relaxation for the patient, encourages participation by the family," Klinger says. (AP Photo/M. Spencer Green)

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Music therapist Elizabeth Klinger, left, speaks with newborn specialist Dr. Natalia Henner in the newborn intensive care unit at Ann & Robert H. Lurie Children's Hospital in Chicago on Monday, May 6, 2013 during a break from playing guitar and singing for the young patients in the ICU ward. Many insurers won't pay for music therapy because of doubts that it results in any lasting medical improvement. Some doctors say the music works best at relieving babies' stress and helping parents bond with infants too sick to go home. (AP Photo/M. Spencer Green)

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Music therapist Elizabeth Klinger, right, quietly plays guitar and sings for Augustin as he grips the hand of his mother, Lucy Morales, in the newborn intensive care unit at Ann & Robert H. Lurie Children's Hospital in Chicago on Monday, May 6, 2013. Research suggests that music may help those born way too soon adapt to life outside the womb. Recent studies and anecdotal reports suggest the vibrations and soothing rhythms of music, especially performed live in the hospital, might benefit preemies and other sick babies. (AP Photo/M. Spencer Green)

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Music therapist Elizabeth Klinger, left, quietly plays guitar and sings for Henry Buchert and his mother Stacy Bjorkman, in the Pediatric Intensive Care unit at Ann & Robert H. Lurie Children's Hospital in Chicago on Monday, May 6, 2013. Research suggests that music may help those born way too soon adapt to life outside the womb. Recent studies and anecdotal reports suggest the vibrations and soothing rhythms of music, especially performed live in the hospital, might benefit preemies and other sick babies. (AP Photo/M. Spencer Green)

Preemies Comforted By Soothing Rhythms Of Spanish Lullabies

Research shows preemies too small and fragile to be comforted by human touch benefit from the vibrations and soothing rhythms of music.

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