HEALTH

How to Beat the Heat
Don't sweat the heat wave -- there are ways to stay cool during the most sweltering days of summer.
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Drink plenty of fluids during the hot weather to stay hydrated. The CDC suggests drinking two to four glasses an hour during the hottest days. Stay away from alcoholic and sugary drinks though, which depletes the body of fluids.   

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Choose light-weight, loose-fitting and light-colored clothing. If you go outdoors, wear sunglasses, wide-brimmed hats and lots of sun screen (SPF 15 or higher). 

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indoors

Stay cool in an air-conditioned place indoors. There are many cooling shelters if your home is too warm. And there is always the mall or your local library.  

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Sweating makes you lose minerals your body needs, and sports drinks can replace them. 

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The CDC suggests using a "buddy system" while working to monitor your co-workers condition. Too much heat can make someone disoriented and lose consciousness. Older folks should have someone check on them at least twice a day, the CDC says.  

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Try to limit outdoor activities to morning and evening hours. 

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Pace yourself. The CDC says if you are not accustomed to exercise or walking in the heat, start slowly. If your your left grasping for breath, stop and head indoors or in the shade. And rest. 

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This seems like an obvious one, but even with windows cracked open the inside of a car will overheat and anyone left inside can get a heat stroke, or die. The CDC making sure everyone is out of the car, and don't overlook sleeping children. 

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Avoid sunburns and over exposure to the sun. If you've overdone it, apply cold compresses or cold water on the skin. Apply moisturizing lotions. 

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Several days of sun exposure can lead to heat exhaustion, which is when the body loses too much water. The symptoms include paleness, weakness and dizziness. When this happens, drink a nonalcoholic drink and head indoors.  

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Monitor those most vulnerable to heat, including infants, young children and people over 65. Children should be watched rather frequently, and adults at risk should be visited twice a day, the CDC suggests. 

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How to Beat the Heat

Don't sweat the heat wave -- there are ways to stay cool during the most sweltering days of summer.

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