Stop Smoking

China considers tougher tobacco controls

June 26, 2012: A student waits for a bus behind a no smoking sign at the State University of New York at Albany in Albany, N.Y. As tobacco bans are sweeping campuses nationwide, one California city has passed an ordinance requiring all apartments and condo units to be designated either smoking or non-smoking. (AP)

June 26, 2012: A student waits for a bus behind a no smoking sign at the State University of New York at Albany in Albany, N.Y. As tobacco bans are sweeping campuses nationwide, one California city has passed an ordinance requiring all apartments and condo units to be designated either smoking or non-smoking. (AP)

China, the world's biggest tobacco market, is considering a draft regulation that would ban indoor smoking, limit outdoor smoking and end tobacco advertising, the state-run Xinhua news agency has reported.

The draft, published by the legislative affairs office of the State Council, or cabinet, and open for public consultation, included plans to curtail smoking scenes in films and TV shows, Xinhua said in a report published late on Monday.

China faces a smoking-related health crisis, with more than 300 million smokers and hundreds of millions more exposed to second-hand smoke each year. However, cigarettes are part of China's social fabric and advocates of tougher smoking regulations have faced difficulty pushing through controls.

The government's heavy dependence on tobacco taxes has been a major impediment to anti-smoking efforts. Last year, the tobacco industry contributed more than 816 billion yuan ($131.70 billion) to government coffers, an annual rise of nearly 14 percent.

Sources told Reuters in September that intense lobbying by the powerful state tobacco monopoly had resulted in the weakening of controversial legislation that had meant to introduce a complete advertising ban.

The draft regulation would ban indoor smoking in public places and outdoor spaces in kindergartens, schools, colleges, women's and children's hospitals and in fitness venues, Xinhua said. The draft also prohibits selling cigarettes to minors through vending machines.

It urged civil servants, teachers and medical staff to take the lead in tobacco control, saying teachers and medical workers would not be allowed to smoke in front of students or patients.