HEALTH

Lost in translation: New HealthCare.gov site launches with major typo in Spanish

Just a year after a botched rollout delayed the launch of the Spanish-language site of HealthCare.gov, the administration unveiled a new version of the site with a major typo on the home page.

 

The Obama administration can’t seem to get its Spanish straight.

Just a year after a botched rollout delayed the launch of the Spanish-language site of HealthCare.gov, the administration unveiled a new version of the site with a major typo on the home page. The very first word on the page in huge type, which is repeated two other times on the site, is a mistranslation of the word “get ready.”

The Spanish-language site had lots of problems last year, ranging from technology issues to clunky translations that left some native speakers puzzled. The administration struggled to sign up Hispanics, the nation's largest minority and more likely to be uninsured than other ethnic groups.

This time, the website designers translated "get ready" as preparase. It should have been preparese — with an "e'' instead of an "a." The same mistake appears three times on the Spanish home page, which is supposed to be a mirror-image of HealthCare.gov. Such a prominent error can unintentionally send a message that the site was not designed to professional standards.

"Where we are focusing in on is a successful consumer experience," said Andy Slavitt, a tech industry executive brought in by the Health and Human Services department to oversee the relaunch.

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HealthCare.gov is the online portal to subsidized private health insurance for consumers who don't have access to a job-based plan. It served 36 states last open enrollment season, while the remaining states ran their own insurance exchanges. The feds as well as some states experienced crippling technical problems, and officials are vowing things will be different this time.

Officials also said that HealthCare.gov won't display premiums for 2015 until the second week of November. Open enrollment season runs Nov. 15 through Feb. 15. Coverage can start as early as Jan. 1.

Based on reporting by The Associated Press.

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