It’s that time of year again where you have to start thinking about the flu shot.

We recently received this question from a viewer:

Q: Can getting a flu shot actually give me the flu?

The influenza vaccine is made from inactive flu viruses, so it cannot ‘give’ you the flu.

However, vaccines, like medicines, can have side effects.

The flu shot triggers an immune response in your body, so it’s possible you may feel some mild symptoms such as:

- Low-grade fever

- Muscle aches

- Irritated eyes

- Soreness or swelling at the site of injection

- Occasionally, hoarseness or coughing

Allergic reactions are very rare, but if you experience any symptoms for more than two days after you have been vaccinated, consult your doctor.

Flu viruses are constantly changing, so we encourage eligible patients to get the flu vaccine every year.

Anywhere from 3,000 to 49,000 people die from the flu each year, according to the CDC.

And remember, getting your flu shot does not guarantee 100 percent protection so make sure you wash your hands often.

If you have a health question, email me at DrManny@foxnews.com.

Dr. Manny Alvarez serves as Fox News Channel's senior managing health editor. He also serves as chairman of the department of obstetrics/gynecology and reproductive science at Hackensack University Medical Center in New Jersey. Click here for more information on Dr. Manny's work with Hackensack University Medical Center. Visit AskDrManny.com for more.