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McDonald's shuts down employee site following scrutiny over posts that told workers to avoid fast food

McDonald’s says it has shut down an employee resources website that contained posts advising its own workers to avoid eating too much fast food.

The McResource Line website now tells visitors that it is down for maintenance and upgrades are being made.

“A combination of factors has led us to re-evaluate, and we've directed the vendor to take down the website,” Lisa McComb, a spokeswoman for McDonalds USA, said in a statement. “Between links to irrelevant or outdated information, along with outside groups taking elements out of context, this created unwarranted scrutiny and inappropriate commentary.”

McDonald’s received widespread media attention earlier in the week for posts on McResource Line that bashed fast food.

“While convenient and economical for a busy lifestyle, fast foods are typically high in calories, fat, saturated fat, sugar, and salt and may put people at risk for becoming overweight,” one post read. They appeared to be designed by a third-party vendor.

Another post showed a meal of a burger, fries and soda – McDonald’s staples – and labeled it as an “unhealthy choice.”

“Eat at places that offer a variety of salads, soups and vegetables to maintain your best health,” the site advised, next a picture of a sub sandwich and salad that looked similar to fare offered at rival Subway. "Although not impossible it is more of a challenge to eat healthy when going to a fast food place. In general, avoiding items that are deep fried are your best bet."

The fast food posts were not the first time McDonalds has been questioned about the content on the site.

Past posts have told employees to shed holiday debt by returning unopened purchases and a budget guide allotted $20 a month for health care, and none for heat, according to CNBC.

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