Children's Health

Panel: Pregnant women, get whooping cough shot

MIAMI - NOVEMBER 03: Marina Spelzini, a registered nurse, measures out an H1N1 vaccine shot at the Miami Dade County Health Department downtown clinic on November 3, 2009 in Miami, Florida.  Unlike other parts of the country which are experiencing long lines and shortages of the vaccine, South Florida is not having this problem. The Miami-Dade County Health Department received 195,000 doses of the vaccine but has only given out about 10,100. Broward County has 52,000 doses on hand and has administered about 10,000 doses.  (Photo by Joe Raedle/Getty Images)

MIAMI - NOVEMBER 03: Marina Spelzini, a registered nurse, measures out an H1N1 vaccine shot at the Miami Dade County Health Department downtown clinic on November 3, 2009 in Miami, Florida. Unlike other parts of the country which are experiencing long lines and shortages of the vaccine, South Florida is not having this problem. The Miami-Dade County Health Department received 195,000 doses of the vaccine but has only given out about 10,100. Broward County has 52,000 doses on hand and has administered about 10,000 doses. (Photo by Joe Raedle/Getty Images)  (2009 Getty Images)

Expert government advisers want every pregnant woman to get a whooping cough vaccination.

It's only the second time a vaccine has been recommended during pregnancy. Flu shots are also recommended for pregnant women.

The aim of the whooping cough shot is to protect newborns, who are too young to get the vaccine.

The panel's vote was a reaction to the resurgence in whooping cough. The nation is on track to have the worst year for whooping cough since the 1950s. There have been more than 32,000 cases, including 16 deaths, this year.

The Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices approved the recommendation Wednesday. Federal health officials usually adopt the panel's advice and send it to on to doctors and the public.