Freeze out bad-for-you foods
If your icebox is full of pizza, pasta dinners and ice cream, it's time for a trip to the grocery store.

TOSS high-sodium TV dinners.
STOCK frozen meals that contain less than 750 milligrams of sodium per serving. This is one-third of the sodium most people should have in a day, which makes it a reasonable amount for one meal.
Watch portions: Be aware of portion sizes when you're picking out frozen meals. Some packages are meant to serve two or more people, so you may overeat without knowing it.

TOSS full-fat ice cream.
STOCK light ice cream. Full-fat ice cream can contain 19 percent of the fat you should have in one day―and that's just for a half-cup serving size!
Try single servings: To avoid the temptation of polishing off an entire carton of ice cream, buy pre-portioned treats. Look for light ice-cream sandwiches or no-sugar-added ice pops. Frozen fruit-juice bars are another delicious choice.

Punch up your pantry's health quotient
Take a pass on unnecessary sodium, sugar and fat in favor of more nutritious options.

TOSS breads, rolls, tortillas and pasta made with white flour.
STOCK carbohydrates made from whole grains. They'll keep you satisfied longer so you'll end up eating less.
Eat good grains: Make sure the word "whole" precedes grains in the ingredient list, and avoid products that contain enriched flour (this means they're not whole grain). Steer clear of bread products that list high-fructose corn syrup as one of the first three to five ingredients; it adds unnecessary calories.

_________________________________________________

More from All You:

Loosen Up! The Common Ailment Your Tight Clothes May Be Causing

Shop Healthy At The Grocery Store: An Aisle by Aisle Guide

8 Easy Ways to Trick Yourself Into Craving Healthy Foods

3 Sure "Slim Down" Foods Everyone Needs
_________________________________________________

TOSS some white flour.
STOCK whole-wheat flour. Wheat has 15 grams of fiber per cup, while white has only 3 grams and contains fewer vitamins and minerals.
Mix your flours: Because the high fiber content of whole-wheat flour can result in less tender baked goods, use half whole-wheat, half white flour to create a similar textures.

TOSS canned vegetables and soups loaded with salt, and canned fruit full of sugar.
STOCK canned veggies with no salt added or reduced salt, soups with less than 480 milligrams of sodium per serving and fruit packed in its own juice or light syrup.
Sneak in veggies: Add low-sodium canned peas or corn to pasta salads.

TOSS cream-based pasta sauces.
STOCK tomato-based sauces, which are lower in fat.
Boost nutrition: Add an extra serving of vegetables by using chopped carrots, peppers, onions, mushrooms or zucchini in marinara sauce.

TOSS tuna fish packed in oil.
STOCK tuna packed in water―it's lower in fat and calories. Beans, water-packed salmon or chicken, and vegetarian refried beans are also smart protein sources.
Lighten lunch: For a low-cal, low-fat tuna salad, use a dressing of half Dijon mustard, half low-fat mayonnaise.

TOSS cereals high in sugar and low in fiber.
STOCK oatmeal and high-fiber cereals. One cup of oatmeal provides 4 grams of fiber, which lowers your risk of diabetes and heart disease. Or opt for a cereal with at least 3 grams of fiber per serving, less than 150 calories per cup and no more than 10 grams of sugar per serving.
Measure meals: Keep a measuring cup in your cereal box. It's an easy way to stick to a one-cup serving size.

TOSS shortening and lard.
STOCK any oil that is liquid at room temperature. Sesame, sunflower, canola, peanut and olive oil are all heart-healthy choices. Oils that are solid at room temperature are generally high in artery-clogging saturated fat.
Use oils wisely: Keep oil in a mister to limit the amount you cook with.

TOSS full-fat chips and crackers.
STOCK whole-grain crackers or baked chips. The full-fat versions have little or no nutritional value and contain more calories.
Snack smart: Get your salt fix by nibbling on protein-rich nuts such as almonds or peanuts. Watch your portions―nuts pack in the calories.

Fill your fridge with nutritious foods
Open the door to these smart alternatives.

TOSS high-fat lunch meats.
STOCK lean ham, turkey breast and chicken. This simple switch can shave half the calories off a sandwich.
Select lean meat: Look for deli meat that has less than 4.5 grams of saturated fat and 480 milligrams of sodium per serving.

TOSS canned or bottled soda.
STOCK seltzer water. Regular sodas contain heavy doses of added sugar, which can lead to weight gain.
Perk up seltzer: Give seltzer water a burst of natural flavor by tossing in orange, lime, lemon or cucumber slices.

TOSS whole milk (unless you have a child between the ages of 1 and 2).
STOCK fat-free or 1 percent milk.
Make the change: Start with 2 percent milk; once you've gotten used to it, switch.

TOSS full-fat cheeses and cheese-food products.
STOCK low-fat versions of real cheese.
Watch portions: Stick to actual serving sizes (a serving is 1 ounce).

TOSS sticks of butter or margarine.
STOCK trans-fat-free margarine.
Read the label: Buy only those brands that list vegetable oil as the first ingredient.

TOSS full-fat yogurt.
STOCK low-fat or fat-free yogurt.
Sweeten it yourself: Try fat-free Greek yogurt with fresh fruit and a little bit of honey.