HEALTH

Caffeine Buzz May Be All in the Mind, UK Researchers Say

BERLIN, GERMANY - JANUARY 24:  A young woman samples freshly-brewed cappuccino at Bonanza Coffee Roasters on January 24, 2011 in Berlin, Germany. Bonanza founder Kiduk Reus is among a growing number of so-called third wave artisinal coffee bean roasters who are finding a niche market in Europe and the USA for their carefully-crafted and expensive coffee. Reus insists that the cast iron parts, the slow-roasting abilities and hands-on controls of his flame-roasting, refurbished 1918 Probat machine allow him to develop the most flavour from his carefully selected beans.  (Photo by Sean Gallup/Getty Images)

BERLIN, GERMANY - JANUARY 24: A young woman samples freshly-brewed cappuccino at Bonanza Coffee Roasters on January 24, 2011 in Berlin, Germany. Bonanza founder Kiduk Reus is among a growing number of so-called third wave artisinal coffee bean roasters who are finding a niche market in Europe and the USA for their carefully-crafted and expensive coffee. Reus insists that the cast iron parts, the slow-roasting abilities and hands-on controls of his flame-roasting, refurbished 1918 Probat machine allow him to develop the most flavour from his carefully selected beans. (Photo by Sean Gallup/Getty Images)  (2011 Getty Images)

The power of a caffeine-filled coffee fix may be all in the mind, British researchers said Friday.

A study by the University of East London found that self-confessed coffee addicts who were given a decaffeinated placebo performed better in reaction time tests than caffeine-consuming participants.

The 88 volunteers, aged between 18 and 47, drank at least two cups of coffee a day for the research and all reported that their mood and performance improved after the drink.

However, those who unwittingly consumed decaffeinated coffee reacted quicker in tests than those who consumed the caffeinated drinks.

"The findings suggest the expectation of having consumed caffeine confers an enhancement on sustained attention that is at least comparable, and perhaps superior to, the effects of caffeine," the researchers wrote in the journal Appetite.

More On This...

For more stories from KTTV in Los Angeles go to myfoxla.com.

Follow us on twitter.com/foxnewslatino
Like us at facebook.com/foxnewslatino