HEALTH

Nervous About Leaving Your Kids at Summer Camp? Try these Tips

CAMP PENDLETON, CA - MARCH 13:  Anne Everett, who is due to give birth in six weeks, and her three-year-old daughter Aubrey wave good-bye to the bus carrying her husband Capt Ben Everett to his fourth deployment to Iraq as Marines and Sailors of the 1st Air Naval Gunfire Liaison Company (ANGLICO) deploy to Iraq for a seven-month tour in the Al Anbar Province on March 13, 2008 at Camp Pendleton, California. The 1st ANGLICO, lead by Lt. Col. Michael J. Gann II, will imbed with Iraqi Army units and other US or coalition forces to coordinate and use Close Air Support (CAS), cannon artillery, and rocket fires to deliver accurate and lethal fires upon their enemies. The air and naval gunfire liaison company evolved from the Joint Assault Signal Companies (JASCO) of World War II. It is historically paired with units such as the 82nd Airborne, 75th Ranger Regiment, and 5th Special Forces Group, and continues to operate with numerous Coalition and Allied forces, including the British Royal Marines and the ROK Marine Corps.  (Photo by David McNew/Getty Images)

CAMP PENDLETON, CA - MARCH 13: Anne Everett, who is due to give birth in six weeks, and her three-year-old daughter Aubrey wave good-bye to the bus carrying her husband Capt Ben Everett to his fourth deployment to Iraq as Marines and Sailors of the 1st Air Naval Gunfire Liaison Company (ANGLICO) deploy to Iraq for a seven-month tour in the Al Anbar Province on March 13, 2008 at Camp Pendleton, California. The 1st ANGLICO, lead by Lt. Col. Michael J. Gann II, will imbed with Iraqi Army units and other US or coalition forces to coordinate and use Close Air Support (CAS), cannon artillery, and rocket fires to deliver accurate and lethal fires upon their enemies. The air and naval gunfire liaison company evolved from the Joint Assault Signal Companies (JASCO) of World War II. It is historically paired with units such as the 82nd Airborne, 75th Ranger Regiment, and 5th Special Forces Group, and continues to operate with numerous Coalition and Allied forces, including the British Royal Marines and the ROK Marine Corps. (Photo by David McNew/Getty Images)  (2008 Getty Images)

The end of the school year means it is time for many parents to send their children to summer camp. Health Watch reporter Beth Galvin has advice for parents dealing with summer camp anxiety.

The YMCA runs lots of camps around Georgia, and they offered some tips about preparing for a positive experience.

First off, they say it’s important to choose a camp that is right for your child. You can check out most camps on line, or visit in person before sending your child. Talk with the camp director, or parents who have sent children there before.

When you check out a camp, be sure to ask how they deal with illnesses and injuries.

Also, make sure you fill out all the paperwork in advance, especially if your child has a medical condition like allergies or asthma.

When you drop your children off, try not to show it. Acting sad or nervous may make the goodbye hard on your kids. Camp operators say home sickness is not as common as many parents believe. Camp staffers should be ready to help children adjust and get settled as soon as they arrive.

Scott Doll is an Executive Director with the YMCA of Metro Atlanta. He says camp should help children gain confidence and independence. Doll says parents should prepare themselves not to be upset if their children don’t want to go home when parents go to pick them up. That’s a sign that their children had a great experience.

For more go to MyFoxAtlanta.com

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