HEALTH

EPA Wants to Limit Perchlorate in Drinking Water

FILE - In this June 3, 2008 file photo, Liberty Valley Elementary School, Danville, Pa., kindergarten student Tianna Swisher attempts to drink from the water fountain at Montour Preserve, near Washingtonville, Pa., during the school's outdoor field trip. Fluoride in drinking water, credited with dramatically cutting cavities and tooth decay, may now be too much of a good thing. It's causing spots on some kids' teeth. A reported increase in the spotting problem is one reason the federal government will announce Friday, Jan. 7, 2011, it plans to lower the recommended limit for fluoride in water supplies, the first such change in nearly 50 years. (AP Photo/Bloomsburg Press Enterprise, Bill Hughes, File)

FILE - In this June 3, 2008 file photo, Liberty Valley Elementary School, Danville, Pa., kindergarten student Tianna Swisher attempts to drink from the water fountain at Montour Preserve, near Washingtonville, Pa., during the school's outdoor field trip. Fluoride in drinking water, credited with dramatically cutting cavities and tooth decay, may now be too much of a good thing. It's causing spots on some kids' teeth. A reported increase in the spotting problem is one reason the federal government will announce Friday, Jan. 7, 2011, it plans to lower the recommended limit for fluoride in water supplies, the first such change in nearly 50 years. (AP Photo/Bloomsburg Press Enterprise, Bill Hughes, File)  (AP2008)

The Environmental Protection Agency is setting new limits for Perchlorate in drinking water. Perchlorate is a toxic rocket fuel ingredient also used in fireworks and explosives that has been linked to thyroid problems in pregnant women and young children.

EPA administrator Lisa Jackson  is expected to announce the new standard on Wednesday, and will say that setting the standard will spark new technologies to clean up drinking water, according to a press release obtained by The Associated Press.

Based on monitoring conducted from 2001 to 2005, 153 drinking water sources in 26 states contain perchlorate. The standard could take up to two years to develop.

In most cases, water contamination with Perchlorate has been caused by improper disposal at rocket testing sites, military bases and chemical plants.

"As improved standards are developed and put in place, clean water technology innovators have an opportunity to create cutting edge solutions that will strengthen health protections and spark economic growth," Jackson says in the statement.

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Jackson will probably make that case before a Senate panel Wednesday, where she is expected to face opposition from freshman Republicans who plan to take on the EPA over air pollution regulations, controls on the gases blamed for global warming and other regulations.

Democrats, who have pushed for the EPA to regulate perchlorate, approve of the administration standing up for rules that protect public health, even if they burden business. President Barack Obama recently announced a review of all regulations to reduce barriers to economic growth and investment.

The perchlorate standard is eight years in the making. In 2002, an EPA draft risk assessment found that 1 part per billion should be considered safe. Six years later, the Bush administration decided not to regulate the chemical, instead recommending that concentrations not exceed 15 parts per billion. 

At the time, federal scientists estimated that 16.6 million Americans could be exposed to unsafe levels through their drinking water.

Sen. Barbara Boxer, D-Calif., who has sponsored legislation to require the EPA to set a standard, said in a statement obtained by the AP that she was pleased the government was "finally going to protect our families from perchlorate." 

California has the most water supplies affected — 58, according to the 2001-05 data. Many of the others are in Texas.

"I will do everything I can to make sure this new protection moves forward," Boxer said.

Pentagon officials have spent years questioning the EPA's assessment of perchlorate's risk but have denied influencing the agency's decisions. The military could face liability for tainting water during rocket and missile testing, since the standard will force water agencies around the country to clean up the pollution.

The Associated Press contributed to this report. 

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