Mind and Body

Giffords' Doctors Balancing Role as Rock Stars

FILE - In this Jan. 11, 2011 file photo, Dr. Peter Rhee, Trauma and Critical Care Emergency Surgery doctor at University Medical Center, describes in more detail the gunshot wound Rep. Gabrielle Giffords, D-Ariz.,received on Saturday, during a news briefing at UMC in Tucson, Ariz. Giffords remains in critical condition, but doctors have reported steady progress each day since she was wounded last weekend. If all goes well, she may be "out of the woods" on Friday, said Rhee. (AP Photo/Ross D. Franklin, File)

FILE - In this Jan. 11, 2011 file photo, Dr. Peter Rhee, Trauma and Critical Care Emergency Surgery doctor at University Medical Center, describes in more detail the gunshot wound Rep. Gabrielle Giffords, D-Ariz.,received on Saturday, during a news briefing at UMC in Tucson, Ariz. Giffords remains in critical condition, but doctors have reported steady progress each day since she was wounded last weekend. If all goes well, she may be "out of the woods" on Friday, said Rhee. (AP Photo/Ross D. Franklin, File)

The two doctors treating Congresswoman Gabrielle Giffords have very different backgrounds and contrasting personalities.

One is trauma surgeon Dr. Peter Rhee, who has treated some of the most horrific wartime injuries in Iraq and Afghanistan. The other, Dr. Michael Lemole, is a reserved neurosurgeon who happens to be the brother-in-law of television show host Dr. Oz.

Together, they have stood before TV cameras every morning to update the nation about their highest-profile patient to date. So far, Giffords is making remarkable progress after being shot in the head.

The doctors are closely involved in Giffords' care, checking up on her and her family several times a day.