The National Museum of African American History and Culture plans to open in Washington DC in September, and one exhibit about African-American entertainment industry pioneers will recognize Bill Cosby-- with no mention of the dozens of women who have accused the star of drugging them, raping them or both. 

Several women who have claimed Cosby sexually assaulted them are outraged. 

Patricia Leary Steuer, who accused Cosby of assault, told the New York Times she is disappointed in the museum..

“If they just speak about the contributions, there will be this enormous presence that is not talked about,” she said.

The exhibition, titled “Taking the Stage,” will include more than 3,000 artifacts. It is set to open in September and the museum’s director Lonnie Bunch acknowledged not all will be satisfied with the curatorial decision-making.

“I know that we are not going to please everybody,” Bunch told The New York Times. “Did we talk too much about religion and not enough about schools? Did we talk about class? Or what are we saying about gender?”

In the exhibit, Cosby’s work in “I Spy” and “The Cosby Show” along with his support of African-American Hollywood stuntmen will be showcased.

Beth Ferrier, who claims Cosby drugged and sexually assaulted her, believes The National Museum of African American History and Culture needs to acknowledge the accusations.

“A label is the only way I would agree to it,” she said. “We’ve been labeled.”

This isn’t the first time Cosby has caused an uproar within the museum community. 

Last year, The Smithsonian came under attack when the National Museum of African Art featured art on loan from Bill and Camille Cosby. Eventually the museum noted they did not condone the behavior that Cosby was accused of.

The National Museum of African American History and Culture did not return FOX411's request for comment.