Even the most anticipated movie in all of recorded history (probably) gets cybertrolled these days.

Minutes after the first movie poster, and just before big trailer for “Star Wars: The Force Awakens,” were released on Monday, an online group, #boycottstarwars, was claiming that the latest installment in the sci-if franchise promotes “white genocide” because Caucasian characters are becoming the minority in the film.

But so far, the hashtag campaign isn’t getting much traction. "Star Wars" fan Ken Shadford told FOX411 the boycott is stupid.

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“This is absolutely ridiculous. A bunch of semi-literate troglodytes want to boycott the greatest movie franchise of all time?" he asked, rhetorically. "I wish them all the luck in the world with their boycott, but I don't think even they will stick with it, everyone knows white power morons are nothing when compared to power of the force”

Fellow "Star Wars" enthusiast John DeVore agreed, saying: "This boycott is nothing more than bigots hijacking a beloved movie franchise.”

Even the film’s director JJ Abrams indirectly addressed the hashtag campaign, writing on his official Twitter: “We cannot wait to share the trailer with you tonight. I don’t care if you’re black, white, brown, jawa, wookiee, jedi or sith. I just hope you like it.”

But while some fans are shaking off this specific instance of cybertrolling, psychologist Dr. Seth Meyers says Internet bullies are here to stay.

“Cybertrolling is an unfortunate manifestation of human nature, as people feel the need to offload negative and hostile feelings on others," Meyers said. "Cybertrolling will always exist as it allows anonymity, and the anonymity causes people to be far more negative than they would be in a face-to-face contact.”

Social media strategist Shannon Self agreed.

“There are people out there that have a desperate need to feel noticed. Social media can bring life to someone who may be introverted and quickly turn them into extroverts,” he said. “In today’s society, certain social media engagement and posts are celebrated and awarded.”

Pop culture watcher Cristina Palumbo said the force is most definitely not with the "Star Wars" cybertrolls, noting: “Everything this hashtag represents directly defies Yoda and his teachings."

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Fox News.com Reporter and FOX411 host Diana Falzone covers celebrity news and interviews some of today's top celebrities and newsmakers.  You can follow her on Twitter @dianafalzone.