Taylor Swift doesn't regret her thinly veiled feud with Katy Perry.

The 25-year-old singer covers GQ's November issue, showing off her slim figure in a form-fitting tank dress. Swift talks in-depth about her songwriting in the new chat, including the fascination with her hit "Bad Blood," and how everyone pretty much assumes it's about the 30-year-old "Dark Horse" singer.

Yet, Swift feels no guilt for what some saw as her igniting yet another female feud.

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"I never said anything that would point a finger in the specific direction of one specific person, and I can sleep at night knowing that," Swift tells the magazine point-blank.

Swift explains that she told Rolling Stone in the now infamous interview that the song was "about losing a friend," so that people wouldn't automatically think it was about an ex-boyfriend.

"I don't necessarily care who people think it’s about. I just needed to divert them away from the easiest target," she admits. "It doesn't point to any one person or any one situation. But if you'd listened to my previous four albums, you would think this was about a guy who broke my heart. And nothing could be further from the truth. It was important to show that losing friendships can be just as damaging to a person as losing a romantic relationship."

Still, author and GQ contributor Chuck Klosterman points out that Swift did give away more specific clues, which narrow down the subject significantly -- like how the individual in question tried to sabotage an arena tour by hiring away some of her employees. Calling Swift's strategy "brilliant" -- working up more interest in the song while at the same diverting from a rumor she didn't want -- he also asks the "Blank Space" singer about being labeled "calculating" over moves such as this one.

Swift is unapologetic.

"Am I shooting from the hip?" she asks, rhetorically. "Would any of this have happened if I was? … You can be successful for three or four years. Accidents happen. But careers take hard work."

And Swift says she's now learning to appreciate what comes from all the hard work.

"You might think a meet-and-greet with 150 people sounds sad, because maybe you think I'm forced to do it. But you would be surprised. A meaningful conversation doesn't mean that conversation has to last an hour," she explains about the reality of her life. "A meet-and-greet might sound weird to someone who's never done one, but after ten years, you learn to appreciate happiness when it happens, and that happiness is rare and fleeting, and that you're not entitled to it."