ENTERTAINMENT

Costa Rican-Born Harry Shum Jr. Lands Lead In 'Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon' Sequel

HOLLYWOOD, CA - APRIL 29:  Actor Harry Shum Jr arrives at the Premiere Of TriStar Picture's "Mom's Night Out"  at TCL Chinese Theatre IMAX on April 29, 2014 in Hollywood, California.  (Photo by Valerie Macon/Getty Images)

HOLLYWOOD, CA - APRIL 29: Actor Harry Shum Jr arrives at the Premiere Of TriStar Picture's "Mom's Night Out" at TCL Chinese Theatre IMAX on April 29, 2014 in Hollywood, California. (Photo by Valerie Macon/Getty Images)  (2014 Getty Images)

With “Glee” on hiatus until next year, Harry Shum Jr. has been keeping himself busy.

The Costa Rican-born actor has been cast as one of the leads in the sequel to “Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon” being directed by Woo-ping Yuen, according to the Hollywood Reporter.

The film, written by “The Forbidden Kingdom’s” John Fusco, is set 20 years after the events from the original and revolves around four heroes who use their martial arts skills to keep the legendary sword Green Destiny out of the hands of villains.

Along with “Crouching Tiger,” Shum also recently wrapped filming of “Revenge of the Green Dragons,” an immigrant drama co-starring Ray Liotta.

While not on set, the 32-year-old “Glee” star has also been working on a video project called “Parallels” that explores his double life as a dancer and an athlete. In it, Shum poses the question, “Is dance a sport? Is sport an art form?”

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“I’m not out to change people’s perspectives and convince them one way or another,” Shum told the Huffington Post. “I just want to open their eyes to the possibilities.”

For the project, Shum was joined by Red Bull athletes Alexey Kolesnikov (motocross), Johnny Johannes (skateboard), and mountain bikers Andrey Lacaondeguy, Szymon Godziek and Thomas Genon, as well as dancers Kylie Lewellans, Remi Bakker and B-Boy Kid David.

The videos are visually stunning examples of the parallels between dance and elite sports.

Although professional athletes have been embracing dance as a competitive outlet and as a way to improve their performance, Shum said he feels there is still a stigma for athletes when it comes to embracing dance.

“Every athlete needs to be graceful, even in high-impact sports,” said Shum, who was a football player in high school before taking dance to impress a girl. “Just look at Michael Jordan, his moves have the grace of a tap dancer.”

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